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Friday, March 13 • 10:35am - 11:55am
Session 11: Crowdsourcing your cultural heritage collections: considerations when choosing a platform

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ORGANIZER / MODERATOR: Trish Rose-Sandler, Missouri Botanical Garden, St Louis, MO

PRESENTERS:

Robert Guralnick, University of Florida
"The experience of the Zooniverse platform in transcribing specimen images, labels and ledgers from museum collections"

Trish Rose-Sandler, Missouri Botanical Garden
"Flickr as both an image sharing and crowdsourcing platform: the Biodiversity Heritage Library experience"

Gaurav Vaidya, Graduate Student, University of Colorado, Boulder
"Describing natural history illustrations in the Art of Life project via the Wikipedia Commons platform"

Crowdsourcing as a method for gathering and transcribing information about cultural heritage objects has been used effectively in improving access to these collections for the past decade. Large numbers of the public can be harnessed in accomplishing a task too large for institutional staffing to complete. There are numerous free or low cost crowdsourcing platforms from which to choose but institutions would be wise to take into consideration issues of metadata interoperability between platforms when making a selection.

This session will focus on the experience of three crowdsourcing projects from a system interoperability perspective. Institutions who engage in crowdsourcing efforts often push their data out to external crowdsourcing platforms where large numbers of users are already describing and tagging content. Once described it is often desirable to pull those descriptions back into a local repository so that those descriptions can be searched there. There are many issues to take into consideration when choosing a crowdsourcing platform, particularly in the area of data interoperability between systems. Data standards can help with this but there are other factors to take into account. The speakers will represent three use cases of crowdsourcing initiatives and lessons learned.

Friday March 13, 2015 10:35am - 11:55am
Confluence C Room, Mezzanine Level, Third Floor The Westin Denver Downtown, 1672 Lawrence Street • Denver, CO

Attendees (34)